Health

EP 36: Small Life Changes to Feel Young and Fit – with Denise Austin

Listen as fitness icon Denise Austin teaches us the keys to longevity, the importance of eating a diet of real food, and how to establish healthy habits with your family.

About Denise Austin:
Denise Austin, fitness icon and pioneer, has been helping individuals worldwide as a health and fitness professional for over 35 years. Denise’s accomplishments include publishing 12 books, selling 25 million exercise videos and DVDs, and hosting the longest running fitness show in history. Every day, Denise inspires women to find their happiness and make small life changes to keep them feeling young, fit, and fabulous.

Links:
Website: https://www.deniseaustin.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/deniseaustin/?hl
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeniseAustin/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeniseAustin
YoutTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-DIS9Yf2M8kbaHjLbvoF_w

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Ep 32: Dr. Cate Shanahan, MD – Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food

Dr. Cate Shanahan MD. teaches us about the problems that exist in healthcare and how it is linked to the modern food system. The key to bettering your health is to eat real food. Listen as we discuss the four pillars of the optimal diet – Fresh food, fermented and sprouted foods, organ meats and our favorite – meat cooked on the bone!

BIO:
Cate Shanahan, MD is a board-certified family physician on a mission to awaken us all to the idea that culinary arts represent a powerful body of nutrition science (including most cookbooks published up to about 1940), and to encourage mothers to let their children grow up to be cowboys (and farmers) because this can save Nature while improving human health.

Dr. Cate trained in biochemistry and genetics at Cornell University before attending Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Practicing in Hawaii she discovered her older patients who grew up eating traditional foods were healthier than their own children and grandchildren who grew up eating according to government recommendations and realized that what dietitians and doctors learn about nutrition is dangerously wrong. She is author of several books including the underground classic Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food, which argues that our genes are programmed by culinary practices of the past and we now need to eat the four categories of foods people have always eaten. She has served as the Director of the Los Angeles Lakers PRO Nutrition Program, and currently works with professional athletes to optimize their metabolism for energy and performance. She also directs a corporate metabolic health program for one of Florida’s largest family owned companies. She has been featured in several documentary films and major media outlets including Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Prevention, Reader’sDigest, the NY Post, and the LA Times as well as on numerous TV, radio and podcast shows.

Links: 
Dr. Cate’s website: drcate.com/

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Ep 30: Dr. Terry Wahls – Diet and Lifestyle to Restore Health and Treat MS

Listen as Dr. Terry Wahls shares how she changed her diet and lifestyle to restore her health and treat MS.

About Dr. Terry Wahls:
Dr. Terry Wahls is an Institute for Functional Medicine Certified Practitioner and a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa where she conducts clinical trials.  In 2018 she was awarded the Institute for Functional Medicine’s Linus Pauling Award for her contributions in research, clinical care and patient advocacy. She is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. Dr. Wahls restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine, The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles (paperback), and the cookbook The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life: The Revolutionary Modern Paleo Plan to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions.

She conducts clinical trials that test the effect of nutrition and lifestyle interventions to treat MS and other progressive health problems. She also teaches the public and medical community about the healing power of the Paleo diet and therapeutic lifestyle changes that restore health and vitality to our citizens. She hosts a Wahls Protocol Seminar every summer where anyone can learn how to implement the Protocol with ease and success.

Follow her on Facebook (Terry Wahls MD), on Instagram drterrywahls, and on Facebook/Twitter at @TerryWahls.   

Learn more about her MS clinical trials by reaching out to her team: MSDietStudy@healthcare.uiowa.edu.

Links:
Research papers at https://terrywahls.com/researchpapers/
One-page handout for the Wahls™ Diet at https://terrywahls.com/diet/

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Ep 27: Chef Nathan Lyon – Fiber Fourteen

Chef Nathan Lyon teaches us about Fiber Fourteen, why fiber is so important for our overall health, and why great food starts fresh.

About Fiber Fourteen: 
Fiber Fourteen is the passion project of Nathan Lyon, an Emmy-nominated Outstanding Culinary Host, acclaimed Cookbook Author and classically trained Chef with a Health Science background and Sarah Forman, a Recipe Developer, Recipe Tester and Project Manager.

In the fall of 2016, a family member (a parent) was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A routine colonoscopy revealed a suspicious polyp which was later diagnosed as a “not a major concern” stage 1 cancer. However, a second opinion classified it as stage 2, possibly stage 3. Needless to say, this news came as a total shock to everyone.

And, what first began as a short visit home to help navigate the diagnoses, turned into a 2-month stay – through the duration of the first-round of treatment: a 6-week course of radiation. Nathan and Sarah took over the responsibility of cooking during the treatment.

Given the type of cancer, treatment and possible gastrointestinal side effects, Nathan and Sarah began making slight adjustments to their recipes. Mind you,their meals have always been on the healthy side: plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, good fats, lean proteins and everything from scratch. But, they decided to make a small change built on a simple idea: decrease the percentage of animal protein so that the majority of the meal is vegetable based (i.e. increase fiber). Armed with their new idea, the challenge was to make those vegetables even more delicious and more satiating than ever before; to make them the star of the show, rather than just humble backup singers.

The meals cooked during this time evolved into the beginner version of the now full-grown Fiber Fourteen Meal Plan, a 14 day fiber-rich, calorie-light recipe meal plan designed to improve your health.

As for the family member who was diagnosed with cancer? They made it through all of their treatments, are recovering quite well and above all, they are living their dreams…

Learn more about Fiber Fourteen at: www.fiberfourteen.com/

About Chef Nathan Lyon: 
Emmy nominated Chef Nathan Lyon is known to television viewers across the country for his simple, innovative cuisine featuring fresh, seasonal ingredients. Chef and co-host of Growing A Greener World (PBS) and host of Good Food America with Nathan Lyon (Veria), Nathan was the creator and host of A Lyon in the Kitchen (Discovery Health and Fit TV), among the final four on the second season of The Next Food Network Star, and appeared as a guest chef and expert on Home Made Simple (TLC) and Real Simple Real Life (TLC).

Nathan obtained a Bachelor of Science in Health Science and a minor in Public health from James Madison University and attended culinary school at Le Cordon Bleu in Los Angeles, where he earned a Culinary Arts degree. Since that time, Nathan has worked in many restaurants, both in and out of the kitchen, and has also worked with local growers in California farmers markets for over a decade.

Nathan published his cookbook, Great Food Starts Fresh, which has been quoted by Alice Waters, Graham Kerr, Curtis Stone and Jamie Oliver and made the Washington Post’s esteemed “Top Cookbooks” list. Nathan received the honor of an Emmy nomination for “Outstanding Culinary Host” in 2013.

Link to Chef Nathan Lyon’s Website: www.chefnathanlyon.com/

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Ep 18: The Role of Today’s Physical Therapist – Matt Foster, DPT

Matt Foster, DPT teaches us about the evolution of the physical therapy profession, treating chronic injury, preventative medicine, and the importance of a healthy diet to fuel our body to be at its best.

Clinical Interests:
Orthopedics and sports injuries, manual therapy, pain neuroscience and clinical research.

Background:
Matt Foster graduated in 2011 from Southern Illinois University with his Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise and Wellness. He went on to graduate in 2015 with a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Washington University in St. Louis, MO. Since graduating with his DPT, Matt has practiced in both Illinois and Missouri in outpatient settings. He has spent his professional career treating various orthopedic and neurological conditions, also including aquatics. He has also undergone continuing education in manual therapy, pain neuroscience, and postural restoration to assist with both acute and chronic injuries of all age groups. Matt is also certified in instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM). He is currently working toward attaining his certification as a strength and conditioning specialist. Matt’s hobbies include hiking, watching football, and exercising including powerlifting and Olympic weightlifting.

Degree/Certifications:
Doctorate in Physical Therapy
Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise and Wellness
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL

To learn more about sports therapy and physical therapy services in St. Louis, visit http://BarnesJewishWestCounty.org/STAR

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Ep 17: Traditional Chinese Medicine and the Importance of Food Transparency – Aaron Lee, L.Ac

Aaron Lee, L.Ac teaches us about Traditional Chinese Medicine and the importance of knowing where our food comes from.

Aaron Lee is a California Board Licensed Acupuncturist. He is also pursuing his Post-Graduate Doctoral Degree at Five Branches University (FBU) where he obtained his Master’s in Traditional Chinese Medicine. He is the owner of Box Acupuncture Traditional Chinese Medicine, a clinic located in San Jose, California. Aaron has a B.S. in Microbiology from UT Austin and he combined his love of fitness and food by also becoming a Certified Primal Health Coach, CrossFit Level 1 Trainer and Personal Trainer. When he’s not treating his patients, Aaron stays active by working out at his local CrossFit Box or he’s in the kitchen meal-prepping or cooking a delicious meal for him and his friends. Aaron believes that the key to longevity is living a well-balanced life surrounded with friends, family, and loved ones.

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Ep 16: CompostNow – Kat Nigro, Head of Marketing and Engagement

Kat Nigro teaches us about CompostNow and how they are doing their part in building a better food system. Composting, healthy soil, community building, and education are essential for us to build a better world.

Kat Nigro lives in Durham, NC and is the Head of Marketing & Engagement at CompostNow. Kat studied Environmental Science with a focus in Soil Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She’s been involved in the community composting movement for the past 4 years and is enjoying watching it grow throughout the country. She’s passionate about healthy soil, community building, intersectional feminism and writing her own introductions!

CompostNow is a doorstep collection service who empowers community members and businesses to divert their compostables from the landfill and, instead, use those nutrients to build healthy soil. Since 2011, their members have diverted over 6.5 million pounds of compostables from the landfill and have created over 2.8 million pounds of compost for local use.

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Olive Oil – Extra Virgin? Not Quite.

Ah, olive oil. It’s healthy, it’s delicious – just opening a bottle puts our cooking ability on par with that of a professional chef. Some people take shots of it every morning. Two women who lived to be over 120 years old both said drinking it was the key to a long life (along with wine and chocolate – now that’s some health advice I’m happy to take!). But if you’ve purchased olive oil from a grocery store, the chances are very high that you aren’t buying what you think you are. And certainly not the good stuff that could help you live longer.

In fact, consumers in the U.S. are so familiar with rancid, low-quality olive oil that they will pick it out of line during a taste test because it’s what they’re used to. Instead of a fresh, grassy, fragrant, buttery, or even peppery smell with hints of fruitiness, we are used to oils that are musty, greasy, and thin.

If you’re not sure you know what good olive oil tastes like, visit a specialty olive oil store. They often offer tastings of their products, and can show you what to look for. We’ll go into more depth later about what to look for in olive oils, since even some of these stores lack good, fresh options.

On a personal note, if you take away one thing from this article, I hope it’s to learn what olive oil is supposed to taste like and how to pick out a good bottle. Do it for me. I personally have shed a tear over a roommate using my fancy olive oil to season a pan, and I’m not ashamed… Okay, maybe I am a little. But I digress – please go find a specialty olive oil store near you and go taste some. Your life will never be the same.

Let’s start with some basics about olive oil.

Olives are picked and crushed into a paste by stones, or more commonly by steel blades. The paste is then stirred to release droplets of olive oil before being spun around at high speeds in a centrifuge to remove the oil and water from the olives. Finally, water is removed until just the oil remains.

If the end oil is unrefined, such as extra virgin and virgin oils, the process ends there and the oil is bottled and shipped. Only the best olives are used for unrefined oils. If the olives are of lesser quality, more processing is required. This oil is further refined using chemicals and heat to neutralize the taste of the oils, as lesser quality olives produce a more bitter and less desirable taste. These oils are often labeled as “Pure Olive Oil” or simply “olive oil.”

So if Pure Oil and Olive Oil mean it’s bad stuff, what about the good stuff? That’s from Italy, right?

It’s a common misconception that only good olive oil comes from Italy. The reality is that Italy is just the biggest importer and exporter of it. Both good and bad olive oils can come from Italy, and there’s also amazing oils that come from countries like Spain, Greece, Tunisia, and (my personal favorite) Australia. Italy just happens to bottle and ship the vast majority of it, which feeds the misconception.

The best and highest quality olive oils are labeled “extra virgin,” which means that they contain pure, cold-pressed olive oils instead of a blend of lower quality, processed oils. That’s why the taste of extra virgin olive oil is stronger and more pronounced than regular olive oil. It’s also the only label that requires any sort of inspection, and must pass lab analysis and testing conducted by the International Olive Council in Madrid.

Neat, so just look for “extra virgin” olive oil and I’m good to go?

Nope, sorry! Nothing can ever be simple when it comes to food. Unfortunately, seeing extra virgin on the label isn’t a guarantee of quality. According to a study in 2010, 69% of imported extra virgin olive oils that were tested failed to meet USDA standards. Often, companies pass off lower quality olive oil as extra virgin – and there’s plenty of room in the supply chain for mixups.

Remember how Italy imports, bottles, and exports most of the olive oil? In November of 2015, seven of Italy’s best-known olive oil companies (does the name Bertolli ring a bell?) were investigated for passing off low quality oils from other countries as extra virgin Italian olive oil. This multi-million dollar systemic fraud case was busted by an investigation codenamed (no joke) Operation “Mamma Mia.” There are even ties to mafia involvement within the Italian olive oil industry. The price tag for extra virgin olive oil rings up at around 30-40% more than the cost of regular oil, which is more than enough for fraudsters to want a taste.

Okay, so sometimes olive oil isn’t totally pure and extra virgin. Kinda crummy, but not exactly unsafe. Why should I care?

In the best cases, “fake” olive oil is labeled incorrectly as extra virgin, or has been mixed with oils that have been sitting around from the previous years’ harvest (or longer). This is totally legal, but completely defeats the main purpose of buying olive oil – that it’s healthy. When mixed with old and often rancid oil, by the time the oil reaches the consumer it’s often lost a good chunk of its health benefits.

In the worst cases, the oil has been illegally diluted (or “cut”) with other, cheaper oils. One way to do this is to add chemically refined, low-quality olive oils. Other popular diluters are sunflower, soybean, and canola oils.  Which, if you have food allergies, is VERY bad news.

That sounds not great. So how do I make sure I’m buying good olive oil?

If you can, hit up a specialty olive oil store – they’re popping up more frequently in the U.S. and often pride themselves on letting you test their products. If it tastes good, it’s probably good.

Don’t trust labels. (This seems to be a recurring theme – check out our guides to eggs and coffee certifications and why transparency could be the solution.)

Don’t fall for terms like “natural,” “pure,” “premium,” “virgin,”or “light.” They are all marketing terms for oil that is heavily processed and lacking in the health benefits of extra virgin olive oil – though they are fine for baking or other kitchen needs where flavor doesn’t matter. And as I’m sure you learned above, even “made in Italy” doesn’t mean much. Even the bottled by dates aren’t good to go by – oil can sit in a tank for a year before it’s bottled.

So if olive oil labels aren’t any good, what do I look for?
Check for a stamp of approval.

There’s a council called the California Olive Oil Council, or COOC, that verifies, tests, and analyzes olive oils to meet high standards. If you see their seal, it means that oil has met their criteria – here’s a list of the brands they’ve approved.

Additionally, the USDA has a voluntary quality monitoring program for olive oils, though only two companies participate. If you see the USDA seal, it means the oil meets these standards.

You can also check for the European Union’s Protected of Designated Origin or Italy’s DOP.

Brush up on your geography.

If you have nothing to go off of besides the country of origin, choose Chile or Australia. These two countries scored the highest average qualities on the U.S. International Trade Commission report on conditions of major olive oil imports in the U.S.

Additionally, Australia has the best testing systems and the highest standards of all olive-oil producing countries. Both Chile and Australia have never been found to mix oils from old harvests.

Know your seasons.

Buy olive oils from regions where olives are in season. This means don’t buy from the Northern Hemisphere in the fall and winter, and don’t buy from places like Chile, Australia, or South Africa during the spring and summer.

Go dark.

Olive oil’s worst enemies are light, heat, and oxygen – they cause oil to deteriorate rapidly. Stay away from oils that are kept in clear bottles or near windows. Good olive oil is often kept in a dark tinted bottle or in a can to prevent degradation of quality. If you can’t see the color, that’s fine! High quality olive oils can come in all colors, from buttery yellow to dark green to nearly clear.

Awesome! Now I have a great bottle of oil – what do I do with it?

Store it in a dark place that’s temperature-stable and not too hot. An unopened bottle can be kept in a cool, dark place for a year or two, but after it’s open make sure to use it within a few months before oxidation causes it to go rancid.

But don’t worry too much – once you have a fragrant, grassy, buttery olive oil at your cooking disposal, it probably won’t make it more than a few months before it’s all gone!

 

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Ep 15: Stress and its Impact on the Body – Alex Uding, PT, DPT, PN1

Co-Host Alex Uding and Host Kari Ginger discuss the effect of stress on the body and why knowing the sourcing of your food is so important for reducing stress and improving gut health.

Bio:
Alex works with healthy and injured individuals alike, across the lifespan. She has special interest in orthopedic and sports rehab, women’s health, strength and conditioning, nutrition, and development of the female athlete. She is passionate about bridging the gap between rehabilitation and optimizing performance to promote a lifestyle of health and wellness through compassionate, person-centered care.

Alex has a Doctorate of Physical Therapy, is Precision Nutrition Certified, and is a Strength and Performance Coach. She works as a Physical Therapist and Performance Coach at Momentum Physical Therapy in Milford, MA.

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Ep 14: Sherilyn Nicholas, M.S., CAGS – Clinical Therapist and Certified Personal Trainer

Clinical Therapist, Sherilyn Nicholas teaches host Kari Ginger about psychology and mental health. The two discuss handling stress, self-care and the role fitness and nutrition play in one’s mental health.

After the discussion with Sherilyn, Alex Uding, PT, DPT, PN1 continues the conversation with Kari to talk about lessons learned from Sherilyn and how they practice self-care in their life.

Bio:
Sherilyn Nicholas, M.S., CAGS is a clinical therapist in Southeastern Massachusetts. She earned her Masters and Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies in Mental Health Counseling from Suffolk University in 2013 and 2015 respectively. She is a Certified Personal Trainer, Group Exercise Instructor, Yin Yoga Instructor, and Mind Body Fitness Coach.

Nicholas is a former Division 1 Track & Field athlete who developed a passion for fitness, health and wellness. She turned to bodybuilding and became an OCB figure competitor and successfully placed in the top 5 of her figure class in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

You can reach Sherilyn via e-mail: sheri.flowwellness@gmail.com

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